Black and Ivory

Color scheme in mind, a 1930’s outfit I would die to have…

The Dress.

Source: J. Peterman Company

1930’s double layer lace gown made by J. Peterman.

The dress is called Bricktop after the American jazz singer, dancer, and vaudeville performer, Ada “Bricktop” Smith.

The Coat & Scarf.

Source: Couture Allure

The dress could easily be worn by itself, but on those cold winter nights this 1930’s coat and scarf will keep you warm and vintage chic. The coat is black velvet and both are newly available among couture allure’s collection of vintage items for sale.

The Necklace.

Source: http://www.rubylane.com/info/shop.html

Keeping with the 1930’s black and ivory theme, here we have a Bakelite necklace available. Bakelite has made a ton of vintage dress clips, pins, baubles, and other jewelry. From my experience, quality has always been wonderful.

The Shoes.

Source: Aris Allen

1930’s style black and ivory pumps from Aris Allen.

Aris Allen shoes have been the most comfortable and affordable vintage reproduction shoes I have found. I think this particular shoe would be a perfect match to the Bakelite necklace. After all accessories can make the outfit.

Any additions any of you, my vintage fashion savvy readers, would add or change?

Men – What would you wear to compliment this outfit?

1920s Red and White Striped Heels

What Is Striped & Red All Over???

These 1920’s style heels. The silver stripe accents are very characteristic of shoe from the roaring twenties.

What Is Striped & Red All Over???

These 1920’s style heels. The silver stripe accents are very characteristic of shoes from the roaring twenties.

1940s Suede Shoes by Walk Over – 1948

Source: Walk Over Shoes

Suede 1940’s shoes with three buckles that strap across the vamp.

Source: Walk Over Shoes

You can get these from dancestore.com, made by Aris Allen, and they are super cute. I always stay away from high heels because they are very strenuous on one’s feet, but these are totally comfy.

Below is a 1948 ad showing a model wearing what is clearly a prototype of them as they don’t look exactly like the vintage ones in the photograph above. Magazine ad illustrations rarely looked exactly like the real thing – in fact many back in the day had little disclaimers: “these drawings are actual photographs”! Especially brands like Air Step with their wildly exaggerated heels. When you see actual Air Step shoes they don’t look a thing like the ads. Red Cross is another brand that, for the life of me, I can never find a real-life version of the shoes in the ads! Maybe the ones in the ads were bait-and-switch… lure them in with a $50 shoe, send them home with a $6 one.

 Another ad for this shoe is posted here: 1948 Walk-Over Shoes Ad.

1948-Walk-Over-Shoes-Ad-for-womens-3-buckle-shoes

And below – the Aris Allen version (click here to see the original of this shoe in the Aris Allen Baltimore Shoeseum):

Source: Aris Allen

1930s Yellow Silk Lace Up Heels

Spring In Your Step

This 1930’s peep-toe style shoe has cut-outs and floral patterns. I enjoy the vibrant colors they chose, and kept consistent with a yellow ribbon to lace up the shoe. Between the colors, the style, and overall cuteness of this shoe, it just screams springtime to me.

Spring In Your Step

This vintage 1930’s peep-toe style shoe has cut-outs and floral patterns. I adore the vibrant colors they chose, and kept consistent with the ribbon. Between the colors, the style, and overall cuteness of this shoe, it just sings springtime to me.

1920s Photo of Bathing Beauty with Swim Shoes by Hood Seaview

Source: Chuckman’s Photo WordPress via Mack Sennett Comedies

Photo from the 1920’s depicting a woman in her bathing attire. I can only imagine the tan lines those shoes would give her.

Source: Contentment Farm via Hood Sea View

1920’s bathing shoes resembling the ones in the picture above.

1920s Ornate Gold and Mesh T-Strap Women’s Dance Shoes

Golden 1920’s T-straps for the flapper girl of today. The floral designs are reminiscent of the renaissance era, but have a twist that is vintage chic. These would be great to match with a golden brooch and hairpiece for that perfect vintage 20’s look. Found on eBay.

Fluoroscope Visited

So last month I had posted about the crazy shenanigans that people would put up with for footwear. Since that post I have been traveling, and what I came across on my trip was an actual vintage fluoroscope. Atlanta’s science museum enticed me in with their pirate exhibit, and upon leaving the exhibit I found a section for crazy health tactics in history.

1930s-fluoroscope-used-for-shoe-fitting-x-rays

This picture doesn’t seem to give you an idea on how large this really is. I am about 5’8″ tall and it came up to my chest. Quite a large machine to be using for sizing shoes. They provided an average exposure chart based on your distance.

1930s-fluoroscope-used-for-shoe-fitting-x-rays2

This gives you a better idea that the customer is at a much larger risk having their feet exposed to 12 R/hr. The R stands for roentgen which is no longer used to measure radiation levels. According to wikipedia about 500 Roentgens in a five hour span can kill a human.

1930s-fluoroscope-used-for-shoe-fitting-x-rays3

So if you are ever in Atlanta, swing by the science museum and check out this exhibit. They also had a radio set up that transmitted different sounds that were supposed to help sooth a number of disorders/disease. Included in these were paranoia and obesity.

Fluoroscope – Fashion Is A Science

Fashion is a science

This machine is called a fluoroscope, and well basically gave you a reading on shoe fittings. You would stick your feet in the rectangular opening, then peer through the sight in the top. This would give you an x-ray like view so you could ‘scientifically’ fit your shoes.

Although, this method does expose individuals to radiation, but that is just a price you pay for great fitting shoes back in the day!

Fashion is a science

This machine is called a fluoroscope, and well basically gave you a reading on shoe fittings. You would stick your feet in the rectangular opening, then peer through the sight in the top. This would give you an x-ray like view so you could ‘scientifically’ fit your shoes.

Although, this method does expose individuals to radiation, but that is just a price you pay for great fitting shoes back in the day!